Tag: 上海七宝楼风

Cloud database removed after exposing details on 80 million US households

first_img Security Internet A database with info on 80M+ US households was left open… Hacking Privacy Microsoft Now playing: Watch this: 1:48 11 Tags Comments Unlike a hack, you don’t need to break into a computer system to access an exposed database. You simply need to find the IP address, the numerical code assigned to any given web page. There’s no indication, though, that the information in this database was accessed by cybercriminals.For the research, Rotem and Locar partnered with VPNmentor, an Israeli company that reviews privacy products called VPNs and receives commissions when readers choose one they like. In a blog post Monday, the company called on the public to help it identify who might own the data so that it can be secured.”The 80 million families listed here deserve privacy,” the company said in its blog post.Rotem found that the data was stored on a cloud service owned by Microsoft. Securing the data is up to the organization that created the database, and not Microsoft itself.”We have notified the owner of the database and are taking appropriate steps to help the customer remove the data until it can be properly secured,” a Microsoft spokesperson told CNET in a statement Monday.The server hosting the data came online in February, Rotem found, and he discovered it in April using tools he developed to search for and catalog unsecured databases. In January, he also found a security flaw in a widely used airline booking system called Amadeus that could allow an attacker to view and alter airline bookings.The cache of demographic information included data about adults aged 40 and older. Many people listed are elderly, which Rotem said could put them at risk from scammers tempted to use the information to try to defraud them.Originally published April 29, 5 a.m. PT.Update, 11:15 a.m.: Adds comment from Microsoft and more information about the cybersecurity research team. Update, 12:12 p.m.: Notes that the database has been taken offline. Angela Lang/CNET In a blow to consumers’ privacy, the addresses and demographic details of more than 80 million US households were exposed on an unsecured database stored on the cloud, independent security researchers have found.The details included names, ages and genders as well as income levels and marital status. The researchers, led by Noam Rotem and Ran Locar, were unable to identify the owner of the database, which until Monday was online and required no password to access. Some of the information was coded, like gender, marital status and income level. Names, ages and addresses were not coded.The data didn’t include payment information or Social Security numbers. The 80 million households affected make up well over half of the households in the US, according to Statista.”I wouldn’t like my data to be exposed like this,” Rotem said in an interview with CNET. “It should not be there.”Rotem and his team verified the accuracy of some data in the cache but didn’t download the data to minimize the invasion of privacy of those listed, he said.It’s one more example of a widespread problem with cloud data storage, which has revolutionized how we store valuable information. Many organizations don’t have the expertise to secure the data they keep on internet-connected servers, resulting in repeated exposures of sensitive data. Earlier in April, a researcher revealed that patient information from drug addiction treatment centers was exposed on an unsecured database. Another researcher found a giant cache of Facebook user data stored by third-party companies on another database that was publicly visible. I wouldn’t like my data to be exposed like this. It should not be there. Noam Rotem, security researcher Share your voicelast_img read more

15 killed after container truck collides with bus in Maharashtras Dhule

first_imgThe cause of the incident has not been ascertained yet. TwitterAt least 15 people were killed and 23 injured after a container truck collided with a state transport bus in Maharashtra’s Dhule district on Sunday, August 18.The crash took place at around 10:30 pm on the Shahada-Dondaicha road near Nimgul village. The Aurangabad-bound bus was reportedly carrying 45 people. The cause of the incident has not been ascertained yet.”The truck came speeding towards the bus and ran through almost the entire length of the bus. Eleven people were killed on the spot and 25 were injured,” senior police inspector Hemant Patil of Dondaicha police station was quoted as saying by Hindustan Times. The injured were rushed to a Dhule state hospital, an official reportedly said. The bodies of the deceased have been sent to Dondaicha primary health centre for post-mortem . A case of accidental death was registered at Dondaicha police station of Dhule police’s Shirpur division.Dhule’s Additional Superintendent of Police (ASP) Raju Bhujbal announced that the kin of the deceased will be given an ex-gratia amount of Rs 15,000 and the injured passengers will be given Rs 1,000 each.last_img read more

Families remain ignorant for 4 yrs about missing persons

first_imgShahnaz Begum, wife of missing BNP leader Humayun Parvez, speaks at a seminar at DRU in Dhaka. Photo: Prothom AloShahriar Kabir broke down in tears, saying, “If anyone’s father dies, they can go the grave and pray. But I don’t even know whether my father is dead or alive.”Shahriar is the son of Laksham (Comilla) BNP leader Humayun Parvez who has been missing for four years.On 27 November 2013, Humayun Parvez with two leaders of Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP), Saiful Islam and Jasimuddin, had been going to Dhaka from Laksham by ambulance. A team of RAB-11 intercepted them in Comilla’s Harispur and picked them up in their vehicle. He has not been heard of since, said Humayun’s son Shahriar.He was speaking at a seminar organised by Bangladesh Nagorik Odhikar Forum to demand an end to the disappearances, killings and oppression.  Members of other families of abducted persons gathered at the Dhaka Reporters’ Unity (DRU) yesterday, Sunday, to attend the seminar, demanding that the missing persons be returned.The seminar was chaired by Humayun Parvez’s wife Shahnaz Begum.Shahnaz Begum said Humayun’s father had finally passed away without knowing the fate of his son. She demanded justice for all extrajudicial killings and abductions.Her son Shahriar said that a case was lodged with the Laksham police station four years ago, but no headway was made in the case.Rafsanul Islam, son of another victim Saiful Islam, claimed that he filed a case about four years ago, but there has been no progress in the case. The police were silent about it.The speakers at the programme said that nearly 400 people including BNP leader Ilias Ali and Chowdhury Alam, politicians, teachers, media persons, and publishers had disappeared.Sajedul Islam disappeared from the capital four years ago. His sister Afroza Islam said, “RAB picked Sajedul and eight others from Bashundhara residential area on 4 December, 2013. The families are still looking. The home minister has simply said that they cannot find them.Afroza thinks that the missing persons had been abducted for criticising the government.Khondokar Mosharraf Hossain, member of BNP’s permanent committee, was the chief guest at the seminar, with professor Siddiqur Rahman from Dhaka University as special guest. Lawyer Rafique Sikder read the keynote.last_img read more

Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in

first_imgIn vivo microscopy imaging of blood vascular endothelial cells using QD-Ab conjugates. Credit: PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1421632111 (Phys.org)—To understand cell function, we need to be able to study them in their native environment, in vivo. While there are many techniques for studying cells in vitro, or in the laboratory setting, in vivo studies are much more difficult. A new study by a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Medical School used a unique quantum dot-antibody conjugate to facilitate in vivo studies of bone marrow stem cells in mice. This study was reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Typically, to study a cell in vivo involves making invasive modifications to the cell or the organism that disrupt the cell’s native environment. Additionally, many in vivo studies involve studying groups of cells, rather than tracking a single cell. Prior techniques involved manipulating the cells by immunohistochemistry, genetic engineering, or irradiation of the organism. All of these techniques either create substantial changes to the native environment, or they are only able to look at a “snapshot” of the cell interacting with its environment. It cannot study the movement of the cell throughout the body.Quantum dots are semi-conductor-like nanoparticles with optical properties that can be finely tuned for a wide range of optical-based studies, including infrared and fluorescence. Han, et al. targeted a particular cell type by combining quantum dots with antibodies matched to the cell’s surface receptors, so that they would combine like a lock and key . Their quantum dot-antibody system was built from quantum dots combined with polyimidazole ligands (PILs) and norbornene. PILs are highly stable and will coat the surface of quantum dots. Norbornene is a versatile functional group that maintains a neutral charge, making it a good choice for diffusing throughout the body. Norbornene was attached to an antibody that was specific for Sca1+c-Kit+ cells, which are a type of stem cell found in the calvarial bone marrow. The quantum dot-antibody conjugates were small enough to diffuse through the cell and were specific enough that they did not attach to unwanted cells. Additionally, they provided an adequate signal for optical studies and flow cytometry, allowing the study of Sca1+c-Kit+ cell diffusion in the bone marrow of unmanipulated mice. This method for studying single cells in their native environment is versatile enough to be used for other cell types by attaching different antibodies to a quantum dot. Additionally, the study showed that the quantum dot-antibody conjugates were highly stable with a long circulation half-life, allowing for a more extensive study of cellular interactions in vivo. Finally, the purification process produced highly pure conjugates with few unbound molecules, and the quantum dot-antibody conjugate size was appropriate for diffusion through the mouse. This research has broader applications, as many of the factors the researchers addressed are constraints for any in vivo cell studies. © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Explore further More information: Quantum dot/antibody conjugates for in vivo cytometric imaging in mice, Hee-Sun Han, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1421632111AbstractMultiplexed, phenotypic, intravital cytometric imaging requires novel fluorophore conjugates that have an appropriate size for long circulation and diffusion and show virtually no nonspecific binding to cells/serum while binding to cells of interest with high specificity. In addition, these conjugates must be stable and maintain a high quantum yield in the in vivo environments. Here, we show that this can be achieved using compact (∼15 nm in hydrodynamic diameter) and biocompatible quantum dot (QD) -Ab conjugates. We developed these conjugates by coupling whole mAbs to QDs coated with norbornene-displaying polyimidazole ligands using tetrazine–norbornene cycloaddition. Our QD immunoconstructs were used for in vivo single-cell labeling in bone marrow. The intravital imaging studies using a chronic calvarial bone window showed that our QD-Ab conjugates diffuse into the entire bone marrow and efficiently label single cells belonging to rare populations of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (Sca1+c-Kit+ cells). This in vivo cytometric technique may be useful in a wide range of structural and functional imaging to study the interactions between cells and between a cell and its environment in intact and diseased tissues. Citation: Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in their native environment (2015, January 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-01-quantum-dots-combined-antibodies-method.html Shining a light on quantum dots measurementlast_img read more