Month: August 2019

Archeologists unearth King David era temple near Jerusalem

first_imgFigurines of a person. Photograph: Clara Amit, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority Explore further Citation: Archeologists unearth King David era temple near Jerusalem (2012, December 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-archeologists-unearth-king-david-era.html The temple was discovered as part of a dig at a site known as Tel Motza, after the city of Mozah mentioned in the Old Testament. The site was first uncovered as construction began on what was to be a new freeway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv back in the 90’s. Since that time most researchers had concluded that the ancient community was little more than a storage facility for grain used by people in Jerusalem. This new find suggests however, that the settlement was more than that.At the time that the temple was in use, a period during the King David era, the First Temple, in Jerusalem had already been built, and worshippers had been instructed to use it instead of other facilities to discourage the worship of various idols. Artifacts found inside the temple show that the people who visited the temple had chosen to ignore the decree and instead continued to idolize their icons as they chose. What’s surprising, the researchers note, is how close the temple, and hence the ongoing idol worshiping practices, were to Jerusalem – close enough to walk. (Phys.org)—Israel’s Antiquities Authority (IAA) has announced that archeologists have unearthed a temple within walking distance of Jerusalem that appears to be approximately 2,750 years old. Artifacts found inside the temple suggest that despite the ban on idol worship at the time, those who visited the temple continued to engage in such practices. Figurine of a horse. Photograph: Clara Amit, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authoritycenter_img Ancient seal found in Jerusalem linked to ritual © 2012 Phys.org The newly discovered temple has exceptionally thick walls and is situated facing towards the east, to take advantage of the rising sun – its rays would have illuminated the objects that sat inside the temple, a clear attempt to glorify them. The temple also had what the researchers believe was once an alter in the courtyard along with a host of sacred vessels – pottery fragments and pieces of chalices – likely used for ceremonial purposes.The discovery of the temple has historians excited because very few of them from that era have survived to modern times. Also, notably, researchers have found figurines inside the temple, representing animals – and some human – that hint, they say, of a coastal Philistine influence. They note that much more research will have to be undertaken before an accurate picture of the temple and surrounding area can be made. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in

first_imgIn vivo microscopy imaging of blood vascular endothelial cells using QD-Ab conjugates. Credit: PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1421632111 (Phys.org)—To understand cell function, we need to be able to study them in their native environment, in vivo. While there are many techniques for studying cells in vitro, or in the laboratory setting, in vivo studies are much more difficult. A new study by a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Medical School used a unique quantum dot-antibody conjugate to facilitate in vivo studies of bone marrow stem cells in mice. This study was reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Typically, to study a cell in vivo involves making invasive modifications to the cell or the organism that disrupt the cell’s native environment. Additionally, many in vivo studies involve studying groups of cells, rather than tracking a single cell. Prior techniques involved manipulating the cells by immunohistochemistry, genetic engineering, or irradiation of the organism. All of these techniques either create substantial changes to the native environment, or they are only able to look at a “snapshot” of the cell interacting with its environment. It cannot study the movement of the cell throughout the body.Quantum dots are semi-conductor-like nanoparticles with optical properties that can be finely tuned for a wide range of optical-based studies, including infrared and fluorescence. Han, et al. targeted a particular cell type by combining quantum dots with antibodies matched to the cell’s surface receptors, so that they would combine like a lock and key . Their quantum dot-antibody system was built from quantum dots combined with polyimidazole ligands (PILs) and norbornene. PILs are highly stable and will coat the surface of quantum dots. Norbornene is a versatile functional group that maintains a neutral charge, making it a good choice for diffusing throughout the body. Norbornene was attached to an antibody that was specific for Sca1+c-Kit+ cells, which are a type of stem cell found in the calvarial bone marrow. The quantum dot-antibody conjugates were small enough to diffuse through the cell and were specific enough that they did not attach to unwanted cells. Additionally, they provided an adequate signal for optical studies and flow cytometry, allowing the study of Sca1+c-Kit+ cell diffusion in the bone marrow of unmanipulated mice. This method for studying single cells in their native environment is versatile enough to be used for other cell types by attaching different antibodies to a quantum dot. Additionally, the study showed that the quantum dot-antibody conjugates were highly stable with a long circulation half-life, allowing for a more extensive study of cellular interactions in vivo. Finally, the purification process produced highly pure conjugates with few unbound molecules, and the quantum dot-antibody conjugate size was appropriate for diffusion through the mouse. This research has broader applications, as many of the factors the researchers addressed are constraints for any in vivo cell studies. © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Explore further More information: Quantum dot/antibody conjugates for in vivo cytometric imaging in mice, Hee-Sun Han, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1421632111AbstractMultiplexed, phenotypic, intravital cytometric imaging requires novel fluorophore conjugates that have an appropriate size for long circulation and diffusion and show virtually no nonspecific binding to cells/serum while binding to cells of interest with high specificity. In addition, these conjugates must be stable and maintain a high quantum yield in the in vivo environments. Here, we show that this can be achieved using compact (∼15 nm in hydrodynamic diameter) and biocompatible quantum dot (QD) -Ab conjugates. We developed these conjugates by coupling whole mAbs to QDs coated with norbornene-displaying polyimidazole ligands using tetrazine–norbornene cycloaddition. Our QD immunoconstructs were used for in vivo single-cell labeling in bone marrow. The intravital imaging studies using a chronic calvarial bone window showed that our QD-Ab conjugates diffuse into the entire bone marrow and efficiently label single cells belonging to rare populations of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (Sca1+c-Kit+ cells). This in vivo cytometric technique may be useful in a wide range of structural and functional imaging to study the interactions between cells and between a cell and its environment in intact and diseased tissues. Citation: Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in their native environment (2015, January 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-01-quantum-dots-combined-antibodies-method.html Shining a light on quantum dots measurementlast_img read more

Extinction is forever—and ecosystem recovery takes a really really long time

first_img Life goes on for marine ecosystems after cataclysmic mass extinction Journal information: Science Advances Haijun Song and colleagues, in an article entitled “Decoupled taxonomic and ecological recoveries from the Permo-Triassic extinction,” offer new insights into the circumstances surrounding what was generally held to be a tandem and stepwise recovery, in terms of taxonomic genera and their constituent marine ecosystem, in the Triassic period. The recovery of the ecosystem and its representative taxa was thought to have occurred over several million years, moving from the bottom trophic levels to the top. However, data showing diverse top-trophic-level predators in the early Triassic period seem to contradict this view, along with unexplained gaps in other lower trophic level functional groups. Working from a custom dataset drawn from the Paleobiology Database and published literature, the authors of this study sought to examine the pattern and timing of ecosystem succession in relation to the diversity levels of three groups of fauna: non-motile, motile, and nektonic animals, during the Triassic recovery.To better understand the nature of the Triassic taxonomic recovery, the researchers examined representative fossil data spanning the Late Permian (254.1 Ma) to the Late Triassic (201.3 Ma) for diversity. In collecting data from a total of 51,055 fossil occurrences (defined as the presence of a genus at a stratigraphic unit or site) they found that marine genera attained pre-extinction levels of diversity about 5 Ma after the extinction event, noting “a logistic increase in taxonomic diversity during the Triassic… and suggesting that generic diversity appears to have reached the environmental carrying capacity.”In studying the ecological recovery as a whole in relation to the separate taxonomic recovery, they examined the separate fates of each of the three functional fossil groups. The non-motile group was composed of stationary animals like corals and sponges; the motile group included crustaceans, gastropods, and infaunal bivalves, among others; and the nektonic group of top-level predators included cephalopods such as octopi, conodonts (now-extinct proto-vertebrates resembling eels), bony fishes, and marine reptiles. Citation: Extinction is forever—and ecosystem recovery takes a really, really long time (2018, October 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-extinction-foreverand-ecosystem-recovery.html Explore further A Daonella Lommeli (oyster) fossil dating from 242.0 to 235.0 Ma at the Museo Geominero de Madrid. Credit: PePeEfe/Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0 © 2018 Phys.org More information: Haijun Song et al. Decoupled taxonomic and ecological recoveries from the Permo-Triassic extinction, Science Advances (2018). DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aat5091 Researchers from the University of Leeds studying fossil data surrounding the Permo-Triassic (P-Tr) extinction of 252 million years (Ma) ago found that a marine ecosystem, in comparison with the taxonomic genera that comprise it, took a whole order of magnitude longer to recover after the mass extinction event that defines and separates the two geologic periods. The extinction event was responsible for killing upwards of 90% of all marine animals. These findings, presented in a recent Science Advances article, are especially sobering in light of the ongoing Anthropocene Extinction and the conclusions from the most recent IPCC report. As it turned out, nektonic animals—the group at the highest trophic level—were the first to recover from the P-Tr extinction event in terms of generic diversity, though they declined from their peak in the Middle Triassic well into the last phase of the Late Triassic. Non-motile animals, on the other hand, suffered the worst declines at the beginning of the Triassic, with their diversity decreasing from 500 to 100 genera, though they rebounded and returned to pre-extinction levels by the beginning of the Middle Triassic. The motile group also suffered heavy losses during the extinction event resulting in low diversity before rebounding at the outset of the Middle Triassic.In terms of occurrence proportion, nekton genera went from ~14% in the late Permian period to peak at 67% 2 Ma later, before declining to 11%. Non-motile genera showed an opposite trend, going from 71% to 21% to finally return to 70% at the end of the Triassic. Motile animals however, remained somewhat constant in proportion after the extinction event and throughout the Triassic. The investigators note a similar, though less pronounced trend, in relation to generic richness for the three groups; they also add that trends for composition and structure hold regardless of paleo-latitudinal region.Because the proportion of generic diversity of non-motile animals had been stable at 68% throughout much of the preceding Permian period and again approached this level in the Middle and Late Triassic period, the study authors assert that this represents the normal trophic composition of fauna—that is, as the wide base of a pyramid supporting the two higher trophic groups. This pyramid however, is inverted during the Early Triassic period, with nekton dominating the functional pyramid at 52%, and characterizes a disrupted and vulnerable ecosystem with a diminished food web.Most significantly however, is the finding that taxonomic and ecological recoveries are decoupled. Where taxonomic recovery occurred relatively quickly, as judged by a return to relatively stable global taxonomic diversity, ecosystem recovery is characterized by a much slower “gradual increase in complexity and stability.” The study authors contrast the relatively quick, logistic rate of increase in generic richness that signals taxonomic recovery with a logarithmic rate of increase in the proportion of non-nektonic animals that is consistent with an ecological recovery. This ecological recovery was still ongoing after ~50 Ma, whereas taxonomic diversity recovered in about 5 Ma.These finding show that while this marine ecosystem collapsed in a bottom-to-top manner, its restoration occurred in the reverse order, from top to bottom, where a recovering ecosystem is characterized by an increase in diversity in lower-level consumers, that is, non-nektons. This upends the received stepwise hypothesis that suggests a recovery occurred from the bottom up.And finally, the researchers conclude “This study reaffirms the importance of protecting global ecosystem diversity because, once it is destroyed, restoration requires dozens of million years, much longer than human history.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

The Himalayan expedition

first_imgCascading waterfalls, mighty mountains, wild forests and the lush green valleys  make for everyone’s idea of utopia. For some it is a reality that they breathe day in and day out. The Himalayas, nurtures and sustains the faiths and socio-religious beliefs of its civilization. It cradles myths, legends and tales – some told some untold. Author Alka Raghuvanshi and photographer Sanjay Sharma capture these magical moments in places few have ventured due to reasons of inaccessibility in the book Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ Garhwal Himalayas- Chorus of Solitude. ‘Perhaps it was ordained that many of the trips were made well before the book was even envisaged. And as the reader goes through the maze of legends and reality juxtaposed in weird and wonderful patterns, it would be important to remember that this journey into the unforgiving terrain – one wrong move is all that separates life from life eternal,’ says the author Alka Raghuvanshi. The photographer made endless trips to most places featured in this book in different seasons in his quest for getting just the right picture, including earlier this year in adverse weather conditions. Being the last documentation of the Uttrakhand region before havoc, this book written over six years assumes even more importance in this context.last_img read more

Several killed in suspected Boko Haram attack in Nigeria

first_imgHeavily armed fighters in all-terrain vehicles stormed the town of Kukawa, some 180 kilometres (112 miles) from the Borno state capital, Maiduguri, and opened fire on police and a local market.Kukawa, near Lake Chad, has been repeatedly targeted by Boko Haram, forcing Nigeria’s state-run oil company to abandon prospecting and drilling.The latest attack happened on Monday and was slow to emerge because telecommunications in Borno have been largely destroyed by five years of violence. Also Read – Pro-Govt supporters rally as Hong Kong’s divisions deepenThey (the gunmen) killed several people, especially around the market, where traders had gone for commercial activities,’ the Kukawa local government chairman Modu Musa ‘They burnt the whole market, the police station, government lodge, dozens of vehicles and most houses in the town in indiscriminate rocket and bomb attacks.’Police officers in Kukawa initially intercepted the insurgents on the outskirts of the town and engaged them in a fight but were forced to retreat because of the gunmen’s superior firepower. Also Read – Pak Army ‘fully prepared’ to face any challenge: Army spokesmanHundreds of residents fled to Maiduguri, joining tens of thousands of others who have abandoned their homes and livelihoods as a result of sustained attacks in Borno and two neighbouring states. Nigeria’s government earlier this month announced that they had secured a ceasefire deal with Boko Haram and an agreement to release 219 schoolgirls abducted from their Borno school in mid-April.But violence and further kidnappings have continued unabated.last_img read more

Play time

first_img17th Bharat Rang Mahotsav is about plays from across the world. But apart from these plays, 240 ambience performances by around 50 groups have been scheduled to thrill the audience non-stop at the NSD’s open courtyard. The ambience theatre in National school of Drama is an invitation to folk artistes, students from various institutions like DU, JNU, Jamia Milia Islamia and many more. It is related to gender issues, elections, women safety, harmony and other issues of social importance. These issues will be portrayed in various performances like Nukadnatak (Street Play), Katputli Dance (Puppet Dance) along with varied folk performances. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The ambience theatre is accessible to all at free of cost. Nearly 30 colleges, 15 different folk troupes and 8 new shows of Theatre In Education Company (TIE) will be a part of this new venture, with 4 to 5 shows per group. This endeavor was an initiative by the National School of Drama under the guidance of Amitesh Grover, Assistant Professor, National School of Drama and Naresh, President of NSD Student Union.“The basic idea to behind this concept was to generate interest and to connect the youth to the world of theatre that will help in creating an atmosphere for better theatre productions. Various colleges and educational institution are taking part in it,” said Amitesh Grover.When: On till February 18 Where: NSD’s open courtyardlast_img read more

Lightning strikes kill 13 leave 20 others injured

first_imgKolkata: As many as 13 people were killed and 20 others injured in lightning strikes in various parts of the state on Monday morning.A nor’wester lashed different districts, accompanied by lightning, resulting in death of the victims, who were mostly farmers. They were working in the fields when the accident occurred.Among the deceased, three persons were from Murshidabad, Nadia and North 24-Parganas each, while four others were from Dakshin Dinajpur and Malda, two each from each district. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsAccording to a senior official of the disaster management department, most of the victims were out on streets or fields, when they were struck by lightning. It has been learnt that among the injured, four persons from Purulia are stated to be in critical condition.In view of the warnings issued by the weather office, the district administrations have alerted all the blocks, asking them to take precautionary measures so that such incidents can be averted. The villagers in various blocks have been asked not to work out on the field during a thundershower. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedSeveral parts of South Bengal districts remained overcast from the early Monday morning. There was heavy downpour in the districts of Birbhum, Bankura, East and West Burdwan, Jhargram and Midnapore. The city and its adjoining areas in North and South Bengal also received rainfall on Monday morning. No damage or casualty has however been reported from the city.According to the weather office, a wind measuring around 60 km/h hit various districts, along with the rain bringing down the temperature by a few notches. People from the city have also breathed a sigh of relief, after respite from the sultry and uncomfortable weather. The commuters in the city and suburban areas also faced difficulties in reaching their destinations due to rain accompanied by storm. The regional meteorological centre at Alipore has predicted thundershower in the South Bengal districts in the next 48 hours.Heavy rain and storm have affected train services in various sections of Howrah and Sealdah divisions of Eastern Railway on Monday morning. Many of the local trains were delayed due to safety precautions.Train services on the Krishnanagar-Lalgola section were affected since 9.33 am, as some debris fell on the overhead wire at Bethuadahari. As a result of the incident, 13113 UP Kolkata-lalgola Hazarduari Express was detained near Bethuadahari. A tower van was pressed into action for the restoration of train services in the section.last_img read more

Rs 23 Lakh missing from ATM after robbery bid

first_imgIn second such incident in the last three days, three unidentified men uprooted an unguarded ATM machine and looted cash around Rs 17.5 lakh in north Delhi’s Wazirabad, police said on Thursday.Yogendra Kumar, the person in charge of guarding the Corporation Bank ATM, first raised alarm at around 6 am by contacting a field officer of the bank who further informed the police.According to the police, the accused, who came riding a mini truck, struck the installation at around 2 am on Thursday. “The thieves executed the operation within a matter of a few minutes by covering the CCTV cameras inside the cabin with tapes. But some other CCTV cameras around the ATM machine enclosure captured the faces of the suspects,” a police officer said.Police added that the ATM, that remains unguarded from 11 pm to 6 am, was full of cash as it was replenished on Thursday.last_img read more

Art fair coming of age

first_imgLaunched in 2008, the fair has established itself as South Asia’s leading platform for modern and contemporary art. The upcoming addition of the fair will take place from 28 to 31 January 2016. Building on these foundations, the fair is revising its mission and refining its programming to reflect the best of South Asia’s diversity in the visual arts. It is making a number of enhancements in the organisation which includes significant changes to its partnerships, internal team and gallery programming. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’BMW is the new Presenting Partner of India Art Fair 2016 . For over 40 years the BMW group has made a significant contribution to culture, initiating over 100 cultural collaborations worldwide, from commissioned works by Gerhard Richter for the BMW group’s Munich headquarters, to projects with artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Olafur Eliasson and Jeff Koons.In 2013, the BMW Guggenheim Lab, a global initiative of the BMW Group, Solomon R Guggenheim Foundation and the Guggenheim Museum, premiered in India at the Bhau Daji Lad Museum, Mumbai. The fair announced the appointment of Zain Masud as International Director . Masud brings her experience within the art scenes of the Middle East, South Asia, Russia, China and Africa, alongside her extensive networks within the Western art world. Prior to this appointment, Zain served as Assistant Fair Director to Art Dubai for five years.   Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThis year the fair will be structured into five main sections: Galleries , the main section, which will feature leading Indian and international galleries. Focus will be to show solo presentations which have been curated by participating galleries or institutions. The fair will also showcase leading international and Indian museums and art foundations presenting elements of their programmes or collaborations commissioned specially for the fair. Platform, which will represent young emerging artists or collectives from all around South Asia, open to galleries and foundations within the region. Projects will show artworks including large scale sculptures or site specific installations at the fair. Full programme details including the gallery list, art projects, speakers list and collateral events will be announced on October 2016.last_img read more

Bosss bad jokes can improve your job satisfaction

first_imgIf relationships are good, use of both positive and negative humour by leaders can help improve their subordinates’ job satisfaction, suggests new research.“Generally, people think that positive humour, which is inclusive, affiliative and tasteful, is good in leadership, and negative humour, which is aggressive and offensive, is bad,” said one of the researchers Christopher Robert, associate professor at University of Missouri in the US.“In our study, we found the effects of humour depend on the relationship between leaders and subordinates,” Robert noted. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Specifically, both positive and negative humour use by leaders is positively related to their subordinates’ job satisfaction when the relationship between the leader and subordinates is good. However, when the leader-subordinate relationship is bad, both negative and positive types of humour are associated with lower job satisfaction. In other words, for leaders, sometimes good humour has bad effects and bad humour has good effects on subordinates. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixTo test their theory, the researchers developed two sets of matched questionnaires, one for leaders and one for their subordinates. They analysed responses from about 70 leaders and their 241 subordinates in 54 organisations. “The findings suggest that if leaders wish to integrate humour into their interactions with subordinates, they should first assess whether or not their subordinates are likely to interpret their humourous overtures positively,” Robert said.  These results also have implications for leaders’ strategic use of humor.“Instead of using humour to build relationships, leaders should work to build strong relationships through other means such as through clear communication, fair treatment, and providing clear and useful feedback. Humour then can be used to maintain those strong relationships,” Robert suggested. The study was published in the journal Group & Organisation Management.last_img read more

Turkish Airlines World Golf Cup 2016 begins

first_imgGolf, commonly known as the gentleman’s game, when associated with a high class airline company, ups the class-quotient by great degrees. One of the golf’s largest and most exciting amateur tournaments, the fourth edition of Turkish Airlines World Golf Cup 2016, took place at Classic Golf & Country Club in the national Capital. The global event, which has gone from strength to strength since the inaugural tournament in 2013, featured 100 players, all personally-invited guests of Turkish Airlines. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Ravi Burman, Director, Urgent Care Hospital won the individual competition with 45 points and progresses to the Grand Final in Antalya, Turkey, this October and November. Dr Ranjeet Mehta, Director, PHD Chamber of Commerce & Industry was runner-up, Siddharth Sangwan, Market Leader – Global Technology Markets, Futurestep was third and Rajiv Thapar, Chairman, FFV Services Pvt. Ltd and Meeta Makhan, Director, IDFC Bank won the nearest-the-pin prizes. N K Lenka, MD, Nutrikraft India won the Best Gross Score. “We would like to congratulate everyone who took part in the Turkish Airlines World Golf Cup qualifier in Delhi,” said Ozer Guler, General Manager for Turkish Airlines, North and East, India. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe first qualifiers took place in Dar Es Salaam, Mumbai and Doha in February and the 2016 series will take place across the globe, in destinations including Hong Kong, Great Britain, South Korea, Japan, China, Spain, the United States, Portugal, Italy, France, Greece, Argentina, Brazil and Turkey. The overall winners of the Grand Final progress will play in the 2016 Turkish Airlines Open pro-am, while all finalists are to enjoy a seven-night stay in an all-inclusive hotel. Established in 1933 with a fleet of five aircraft, Star Alliance member Turkish Airlines is a 4-star airline today with a fleet of 300 (passenger and cargo) aircraft flying to 284 destinations worldwide with 235 international and 49 domestic. Turkish Airlines, which was recently voted Best Airline in Europe for the fifth consecutive year, as well as World’s Best Business Class Airline Lounge and World’s Best Business Class Lounge Dining in 2015, launched the World Golf Cup in 2013. After that initial success, there was a rapid expansion to include 70 events worldwide last year.last_img read more

Situation normalises at Dhakuria girls school attendance remains low

first_imgKolkata: Following the chaos that broke out over alleged abuse of a child at a girls’ school in Dhakuria, the situation on Wednesday remained peaceful. However, attendance of the students was much lower than the other days.Sleuths are mulling a reconstruction on the incident. On the other hand, West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights (WBCPCR) has decided to award the four students who saved a teacher on Tuesday, with Birangana Award 2018. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeSources informed that on Wednesday, police personnel including a section from Rapid Action Force (RAF) were deputed at the school. No guardians were allowed to enter the school premises on Wednesday as a security measure.Though all the teachers attended school, number of students in the primary section was very low. Attendance in the secondary section was comparatively high but much lesser than normal.”There is nothing to fear. Police personnel have been deputed here,” said a guardian. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedAccording to sources, investigators are interrogating the accused teacher Dipak Karmakar to know exactly what happened on September 26. Senior officials are also looking to reconstruct the incident with Karmakar. However, it has not been confirmed yet.On the other hand, the four persons arrested for allegedly ransacking the school and pelting stones at police, were granted bail by the Alipore Court.Meanwhile, West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights (WBCPCR) has nominated four students of the school to be awarded with ‘Birangana Award 2018’, for their courageous move to save a school teacher identified as Rupa Bhattacharya, when she was attacked by some guardians and suspected outsiders on Tuesday. The award will be delivered on November 20 at the Eastern Zonal Cultural Centre in Salt Lake.last_img read more

All admissions in colleges should be made online Partha

first_imgKolkata: State Education minister Partha Chatterjee on Tuesday held a meeting with Vice-Chancellors of state universities and made it clear to them that all admissions in colleges affiliated to them will be strictly through online.”There has been some stray incidents of irregularities over admission last year. So students are not required to be physically present in colleges during the admission process this year. All admissions should be online. The colleges can later carry out verification during the freshers’ welcome or sometime later before the classes begin,” Chatterjee stated. Senior officials of the state Higher Education department also attended the meeting chaired by Chatterjee at Bikash Bhavan in Salt Lake. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeThe Vice-Chancellors have also been directed to identify certain areas under the Choice Based Credit System (CBCS) which has created doubts among students. He feels that there has been some gap in communication with students in certain universities when it comes to CBCS system that has been implemented in almost all the universities in the state from this year onwards. It has been found that first year classes have started late in some universities and students have got less time to prepare for their first semester. Chatterjee directed the V-Cs to take necessary steps to ensure that students have a clear-cut understanding of the CBCS pattern. The minister also directed the V-Cs to take necessary measures to fill up vacancies for teachers and the non-teaching staff. “In a number of varsities, posts are lying vacant. If the varsities do not take steps to fill up vacancies on a war footing, we will have to take strong measures,” Chatterjee maintained.last_img read more

North Central Kolkata to get no water supply on March 30

first_imgKolkata: Water supply in a large parts of North and Central Kolkata will be affected on Saturday with the Water Supply Department of Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) undertaking an urgent work to facilitate construction of a ventilation shaft and emergency exit for the East-West Metro at Raja Subodh Mallick Square.The filtered water supply from Tala and Palta will be stopped with effect from 10 am on Saturday and will be restored at 6.30 am on Sunday. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataAn official said this would affect water supply from Tala to a certain part of Bhowanipore and areas such as Shyambazar, Bowbazar, Beliaghata, Park Circus and Entally. The civic body will have to extract an age-old underground water pipe at the intersection of Nirmal Chandra Street and Lenin Sarani for the ventilation shaft, which is meant to be used for rapid evacuation in case of an emergency. The pipe is 900 mm in diameter and is located 12 feet underground. The pipe that will be removed is defunct but supply pipes adjacent to it may be damaged while removal of the pipe. “So we do not want to take any risk,” a senior official of the water supply department said. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateAn official of Kolkata Metro Railway Corporation Ltd, which is executing the East West Metro project, said they needed land for construction of the ventilation shaft at Subodh Mallick Square and several utility lines had come in the way. “We approached the civic body for removing the pipe and they have agreed to it,” the official said. Meanwhile, a team under the Digital India progamme of the central government visited the KMC on Tuesday to take stock of the digitalisation work progress of the latter. Municipal Commissioner and Joint Commissioner informed the team of the various steps that the KMC has taken in connection with this. “The tax collection has been made online and several apps have been introduced in a stride towards digitalization. We have the parking app, the advertising app as well as the health app. The team was satisfied with our progress,” as senior KMC official said.last_img read more

Cycling can reduce your loneliness boost mental health

first_imgFeeling lonely? Riding your bicycles may not only improve your general and mental health, but also increase social interaction, says a study.The study showed that cycling is the healthiest mode of transport and is associated with better self-perceived general health, better mental health, greater vitality, lower self-perceived stress and fewer feelings of loneliness.”The findings suggest that active transport – especially cycling – should be encouraged in order to improve health and increase social interaction,” said lead author Avila Palencia from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) in Barcelona, Spain. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe second most beneficial transport mode, walking, was associated with good self-perceived general health, greater vitality, and more contact with friends and/or family.”Ours is the first study to associate the use of multiple urban transport modes with health effects such as mental health and social contact. It also allowed us to highlight the positive effect of walking, which in previous studies was not very conclusive,” she added.The study, published in the journal Environment International, was carried out in seven European cities: Antwerp, Barcelona, London, Orebro, Rome, Vienna and Zurich and included more than 8,800 people. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe transport modes assessed in the study were car, motorbike, public transport, bicycle, electric bicycle and walking.Driving and public-transport use were associated with poor self-perceived general health, while cars were linked with fewer feelings of loneliness.”This result is most likely due to the fact that the study population drove very infrequently and most journeys by car were probably for social purposes, such as visiting a family member or a friend,” the researchers explained.The study stressed on the need for “an integrated approach to urban planning, transport planning and public health is needed in order to developpolicies that promote active transport, such as adding more segregated cycle lanes for a better environment for cyclists,” the researchers noted.last_img read more

Web series on journey of exIndia football captain Krishanu Dey

first_imgKolkata: A biopic on former India football captain Krishanu Dey is in the pipeline, his family confirmed on Thursday. Regarded as one of the most creative play-makers in the 1980s and 90s, Dey passed away in 2003 following prolonged illness, battling severe lung, kidney and liver infections. A first for Indian football, the biopic will be a web series available on Zee5. It is being directed by Korok Murmu. There will be eight episodes in the first season, highlighting the rise of Dey, who donned national colours in various tournaments, including the 1986 Asiad, Merdeka, pre-Olympics and SAFF Games, and led India in the 1992 Asia Cup. Dey, who had a long stint with city football giants East Bengal, was the darling of Kolkata’s football-crazy fans with his skills, silken touch and delicate through passes. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata”It is a very proud moment for all of us. He never got any award despite being called the Indian Maradona. This is equivalent to an award,” said Dey’s wife, Sharmila. The web series is expected to release in August coinciding with the start of East Bengal’s centenary celebrations.”They (producers) want to release the first episode in August when there will be a year to go for East Bengal’s centenary celebrations,” Dey’s son, Soham said. Maharashtra-based actor Anurag Urha will play the role of Dey. “He is training hard and honing his football skills to try and look like the way my father. “They (director and producer) spoke to some of my father’s teammates to get a hang of how he was on the field and off it,” Soham said. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateBeginning his career in the local league with the Police team, in 1979, Dey had a two-year stint with Port Trust before joining bigwigs Mohun Bagan in 1982. A gifted a left-footed player, Dey first played for East Bengal in 1985 and from then on, in a period of seven years, won many accolades with the red and golds including a treble (Durand Cup, Rovers Cup, IFA Shield) in 1990. In his twilight years, Dey played for his employer Food Corporation of India, which decided to field a team in the local league. Dey formed a lethal combination in midfield with close friend Bikash Panji. The pair caused terror in the opposition ranks whenever they played together, with rival defenders resorting to rough tackles to keep them in check resulting in Dey becoming injury prone. The plot of the biopic will revolve around a German lady coming to India to research on Dey. Shooting is expected to start from next week. There are two seasons planned as of now. “They approached us in December and work started from then on,” Soham added.last_img read more

Going out on a date Try these makeup looks

first_imgConfused as to what make-up look would be suitable for a date? Opt for a ‘no make-up’ look or go bright with colours to woo your partner, say experts. Experts have shared make-up tips to look stunning on your date: Go for no make-up look. Healthy looking skin with neutral eye and muted eyes and a bold liner to add that drama. This can be achieved by opting for good skin care products like a hydrating moisturiser and primer followed by using a sheer foundation focusing more on the skin. Finish off with soft nude lip and cheek stains in neutral tones. Focus on the eyes with a classic bold eye liner. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfAnother look you can opt for is a brown smokey eye and a matte red lip to give the perfect pout. This works well for lunch dates with your beau. Opt for a bright, hot trend. Go experimental with some glitter for making a statement. This works well for a fun night out to a club with your better half or your girl gang. Team this statement look with a classic little black dress. Keep your base clean and glowing. Lashes are a huge trend and can add a nice feminine touch. Team with a nude or pink gloss. Go for pink monotone look. Pink is feminine and trending right now. Opt for pink eyeshadow, pink blush and a hint of pink on the lips. Keep your base clean and dewy. Do up your eyes in jewel tone. Finish with a clear shimmering gloss. This look is perfect day after a long working day.last_img read more

HC stays no confidence motion meet of Gangarampur municipality

first_imgKolkata: The High Court has stayed the meeting to discuss the no confidence motion of Gangarampur municipality in South Dinajpur, which was scheduled to be held on Tuesday.Justice Samapti Chattopadhyay has ordered the municipality to hold the meeting on August 5. She also instructed that security will have to be provided to the 18 councillors on August 5 when the non-confidence motion will come up for discussion. The trouble at Gangarampur broke out after Biplab Mitra joined BJP from Trinamool Congress. Shortly after this, Trinamool Congress removed Prasanta Mitra, Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamatachairman of Gangarampur municipality from the party. Prasanta happens to be the brother of Biplab Mitra. In the 18-member municipality, 8 councillors are backing Prasanta Mitra. The remaining 10 councillors left the town some days ago. They returned to the and moved a no confidence motion against the chairman. The matter was scheduled for discussion on July 23. Earlier, Prasanta Mitra and his followers had moved a no confidence motion and the date for discussion was fixed on August 5. Challenging the no confidence motion, Mitra moved the High Court. Justice Chattopadhyay stayed the no confidence notice which was brought later. The no confidence motion will be discussed on August 5. She has instructed the superintendent of police to provide security to the 18 councillors on August 5 when the matter will come up for discussion.last_img read more

TMC will strongly oppose bill to bifurcate JK Mamata

first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister on Tuesday said her party, the Trinamool Congress, will strongly oppose the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Bill that proposes to bifurcate the state into two union territories. Banerjee also said the Centre should have consulted all political parties before coming to a decision to scrap Constitutional provisions that accorded special status to Jammu and Kashmir. The chief minister was talking to reporters at the Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose International Airport here before heading to Chennai, to unveil a statue of DMK leader and former chief minister M Karunanidhi. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata “The government could have taken the decision after consulting all the political parties and Kashmiris. There was no vote or discussion on the Kashmir issue. This is not democratic. We will oppose it tooth and nail,” Banerjee said. Home Minister Amit Shah had on Monday moved a resolution in the Lok Sabha for bringing a bill to reorganise the state of Jammu and Kashmir into two union territories — Jammu and Kashmir, and Ladakh. The government also revoked Article 370 which gave special status to Jammu and Kashmir. Although the Rajya Sabha TMC MPs in the Rajya Sabha staged a walk-out during voting on the bill, Banerjee said it did not mean that the party facilitated the passage of the bill. “Staging a walk-out from the Rajya Sabha during voting does not mean we are supporting the bill,” she added.last_img read more

Diana Rigg The Game of Thrones Star Beat the Odds to Get

first_img“…the critics can say what they want. I just get on with life and enjoy it.” Diana Rigg beamed as she shared how she felt about her work as an actress these days. In a recent interview with Variety, Rigg shared the ins and outs, ups and downs, and twists and turns of her life on the stage and on screen — a career which has spanned over six decades and won her countless awards. Her career hasn’t always been without pressure though. Rigg started out in theater after graduating from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London. Without any family history in theater, Diana set out to find a job and landed one at the Royal Shakespeare Company. She worked there for five years and became one of the more popular stage actresses during her time.Photo of Diana Rigg from her short-lived NBC television show, DianaAfter a fruitful run with the company, and with no upcoming jobs in the theater, Rigg decided it was time to stretch out and see where her talent could take her. “I wanted to expand and learn,” she told Variety. And that’s precisely what she did.At the time, Peter Hall was head of the Royal Shakespeare Company and he wasn’t discreet about his disdain for Rigg’s decision to leave. He was quoted saying “She’s going to waste herself in television and silly movies.” Rigg recalls being scorned for her choice, but she felt that it was a necessary step for her to reach her full potential.Diana Rigg in a promotional photo for The Avengers. Photo by Getty ImagesSo, in 1965, she took on her first television role opposite Patrick Macnee. She would play Emma Peel in 51 episodes of the hit TV series The Avengers. And for her exceptional performance, she would be nominated for an Emmy twice as the Best Actress in a Drama Series in the years 1967 and 1968.Related Video: The Mythology Behind Game Of Thrones White WalkersBut despite the opportunity to grow as an actress, Rigg learned that life as an actress in film and TV had its own unique challenges. “I was earning less than a cameraman,” the actress shared with Variety. She fought for her right to a better salary, and she claims that put her ahead of the game. “There was no sisterhood. In those days, you were on your own.” the actress said.Diana Rigg as Diana Smythe and her roommate, Gulliver, from the television program DianaIn those moments, Rigg admitted to feeling lonely because she felt that she was being treated unfairly. Fortunately, after speaking out, she received a pay raise and due respect.It was one of her prouder moments away from the screen. According to the Daily Mail, her equal pay battle made her feel like a lone voice, but also made her much more aware and accepting of the struggles of women up to the present day.Photo by Macall B. Polay/courtesy of HBOWhen asked by Variety about her role as Lady Tyrell on the hit TV series Game of Thrones, Rigg claimed to be grateful to be able to play the role. Mostly, it’s because of the general anonymity she enjoys despite playing a major role in a popular show. “It was very, very intrusive those days because I was instantly recognizable,” she told Variety. But these days, she can strut around without having to worry about throngs of people trying to get a glimpse of her.Similarly, she also enjoys playing her role as the Duchess of Buccleuch in season two of Victoria. She was happy to play such an interesting role — a royal woman ahead of her time, who displayed compassion but also wasn’t one to “suffer fools” as the actress described her character.Photo by Helen Sloan/courtesy of HBOWhen choosing roles, Rigg isn’t too particular. She’s happy to try anything new and loves taking on roles that might be fun to play. According to BBC news, that’s precisely why she took on the role in Game of Thrones.Read another story from us: Stunning Real-Life Locations from Game of ThronesWhile she might have been careful of what critics would say about her back in her younger days, the 80-year-old actress is happy to brush off their comments now after over 60 years in the business. “I just get on with life and enjoy it!”last_img read more