Month: October 2020

Tales of the riverbank

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

In the family way

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

MEPC shareholders worried with £1.9bn takeover terms

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Chelmsford in the spotlight

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Counter sinking?

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

WorldCom to axe Thames Valley space

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Yorkshire grit

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Boots in £800m strategy rethink

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Former sports minister Imam Nahrawi indicted for accepting Rp 20 billion in bribes

first_imgImam took office as youth and sports minister on Oct. 27, 2014, and appointed Miftahul – who had been his close confidante and chauffeur since 2011 – as his private assistant.“The defendant introduced Miftahul Ulum to a host of Youth and Sports Ministry officials, suggesting that they first consult with Miftahul should there be anything they would like to communicate to the defendant,” Ronald said.Imam was indicted under Article 20 of the 2001 Corruption Eradication Law, which prohibits civil servants and state officials from receiving gifts or promises in exchange for abusing their power and carries a maximum sentence of 20 years of imprisonment.Imam did not submit a formal objection to the indictment but said that he would present his side of the story later in the trial.“To uncover the truth, I ask that the trial continue to the argumentation stage. But I strongly object to the indictment, and I will express that when I present my defense,” Imam said during the hearing. A team of prosecutors had previously named Imam on a list of alleged recipients of bribes from the National Sports Committee (KONI) to the ministry during the trial of committee secretary-general Ending Fuad Hamidy at the Jakarta Corruption Court last year.KPK also questioned Indonesia’s 2004 Athens Olympic gold medalist Taufik Hidayat as a witness in the bribery case. (rfa)Topics : Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) prosecutors have indicted former youth and sports minister Imam Nahrawi for accepting Rp 11.5 billion (US$840,280) in bribes and an additional Rp 8.64 billion in gratuities from a number of ministry and Indonesian Sports Council (KONI) officials.“Defendant Imam Nahrawi, who served as youth and sports minister from 2014 to 2019 alongside Miftahul Ulum, accepted a gift of Rp 11.5 billion in cash from KONI secretary-general Ending Fuad Hamidy and KONI general treasurer Johhny E Awuy,” KPK prosecutor Ronald Worotikan read out during Imam’s indictment hearing at the Jakarta Corruption Court on Friday, as quoted by Antara news agency.The prosecutors said that the bribes were intended to accelerate the approval and disbursement of a state grant proposed by KONI to the Youth and Sports Ministry in 2018.last_img read more

Walmart loses another home-delivery provider amid Amazon clash

first_imgWalmart is parting ways with grocery-delivery partner Skipcart, the latest defection from its network of logistics companies who often struggle to make ends meet schlepping cola and cantaloupes for the nation’s biggest food retailer.Skipcart notified Walmart on Jan. 31 that it was terminating their relationship effective April 30, according to a letter obtained by Bloomberg News. That end date has since been pushed up to March, and Walmart has already reassigned stores covered by Skipcart to other providers. Boerne, Texas-based Skipcart handles deliveries from about 126 stores in 32 states, mostly in smaller markets, and began working with Walmart in late 2018.A representative for Walmart declined to comment. The departure of Skipcart follows those of Deliv last year and Uber Technologies in 2018, highlighting the tricky economics of so-called “last mile” delivery as more and more Americans buy groceries online. Skipcart Chief Executive Officer Ben Jones said his company was handling about 50,000 Walmart deliveries a month, but was losing money “hand over fist.” He said he would rather focus on restaurant deliveries, which are easier and more profitable to shuttle than carloads of bottled water and paper towels.“The grocery model does not work,” Jones said in an interview. “It doesn’t work today, and it’s not going to work six months from now. We’re all losing money.”Neck-and-NeckWalmart can’t afford to lose momentum in its market-leading grocery business, which makes up 56 percent of its US sales and has fueled its run of 22 consecutive quarters of same-store sales growth in its home market. Amazon.com now offers two-hour grocery delivery for its Prime customers for free in more than 2,000 cities, and grocery orders more than doubled in the fourth quarter.While the web only accounts for about 4% of the $800 billion US grocery sector, adoption is increasing. Over half of all current online grocery shoppers started doing so over the past year, according to a survey of about 3,000 Americans by Morgan Stanley. Walmart and Amazon are neck-and-neck at the top of the market, the survey found, with about half of all web shoppers having used one of them in the past three months.Walmart offers home delivery of groceries from about 1,600 stores today, double the number it had a year ago, with the goods ferried by a patchwork of companies including Postmates, DoorDash, Roadie and Point Pickup. Customers pay a fee of $7.95 to $9.95, which varies based on the delivery time. The retailer has also built its own internal delivery platform for self-employed drivers called Spark, which is now available in 31 states, and it’s testing autonomous vehicles as well.Food shoppers can also pick up online orders in Walmart’s parking lots for free at 3,200 stores, with another 500 coming on board this year.Topics :last_img read more