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Brisbane’s auction hot spots: The suburbs where you’re more likely to sell your home at auction

first_imgThis house at 9 Rugby St, Coorparoo, is going to auction.Mr Lloyd said the brand new five-bedroom, three-bathroom house on a 728 sqm block was the perfect family home and could not be in a better location.“Coorparoo is just a fantastic suburb,” he said.“It’s got the new Coorparoo Square going in, it’s close to the city and the Gabba, and is very good for families.”Mr Lloyd admitted he was initially hesitant about taking the property to auction.“There’s a lot of buyers out there looking for good products and the best way to realise true market value is through an auction,” he said.“It gives it a clear time frame and a bit of urgency for potential buyers.” NEW WAY TO PAY FOR RENTALS The new Coorparoo Square development in Coorparoo. Picture: Brian Bennion.Across the regions, auction volumes fell on the Sunshine Coast, while the Gold Coast was the busiest market with 752 homes going under the hammer.Despite this, the Gold Coast recorded the lowest success rate during the quarter of 39 per cent.BRISBANE’S AUCTION HOT SPOTSSuburb Clearance rate (Dec. Q) Total auctions (Dec. Q)Coorparoo 63.0% 32Ashgrove 61.5% 28New Farm 57.1% 22Paddington 52.9% 38Clayfield 51.9% 31Bardon 48.0% 32Morningside 47.6% 22Camp Hill 47.2% 36Calamvale 45.5% 22Eight Mile Plains 45.5% 35Cleveland 45.0% 25Bulimba 45.0% 20Ascot 45.0% 21Sunnybank Hills 43.9% 60Hamilton 43.5% 23Hendra 37.0% 30Sunnybank 25.0% 20(Source: CoreLogic) Crowds gather at an inner-city house auction.Marketing agent Phil Burley of Place Bulimba said auctions were becoming more popular among buyers and sellers in Brisbane’s inner-city market.“I think the whole inner-city market is more comfortable with buying and selling at auction,” Mr Burley said.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours ago“Sellers in particular are more and more comfortable to let the market determine the value of their property, which has been a reluctance in the past.”He said he was not surprised Coorparoo had the highest auction clearance rate in Brisbane, given the quality of homes and schools in the area and new developments like Coorparoo Square. Rebecca and Michael Lloyd with Boston 7yrs at their Hamptons-inspired home at 9 Rugby St, Coorparoo which will go to auction at 11am on February 10. Picture: Annette DewBRISBANE’S auction market is outperforming the rest of the country, with new figures revealing it was the only capital city, besides Adelaide, to record a rise in its clearance rate last quarter. And the city’s new auction hot spots are no longer the usual blue-chip suspects, with homes more likely to sell under the hammer in suburbs such as Coorparoo, Calamvale, Morningside, Sunnybank and Eight Mile Plains.While the number of homes selling at auction across the country fell in the three months to the end of December, Brisbane bucked the trend, according to the latest figures from property analytics company CoreLogic.Sydney led the overall decline, with its auction clearance rate plummeting from 66.8 per cent to 57.7 per cent — another indicator the country’s biggest housing market is cooling — while Brisbane recorded a 0.2 per cent rise in its success rate to 46.7 per cent.After Sydney and Melbourne, the Queensland capital also had the most auctions during the December quarter, with 2012 properties. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE CoreLogic’s latest auction review reveals the national clearance rate has fallen.More homes were taken to auction in Sunnybank Hills than anywhere in Brisbane in the final quarter of 2017, while Coorparoo saw the most properties sell at auction; recording a clearance rate of 63 per cent.Just 5km from the CBD, Coorparoo has a median house price of $860,000.Michael and Rebecca Lloyd’s Hamptons inspired home at 9 Rugby St, Coorparoo, is scheduled to be auctioned on Saturday, February 10 at 11am. HOTTEST RENT SPOTS REVEALED last_img read more

​Companies behaving badly will be post-crisis losers, say USS, BTPS

first_imgFellow panelist Morten Nilsson, CEO of the BT Pension Scheme, said that in his view, ESG was becoming much more important as a result of the pandemic.“In this situation we are in where the government response has been so bold and so extreme, paying salaries to private sector employees for quite a while – the other side of this is the expectation that these companies will do their duty and be good corporate citizens and actually repay society,” he said.This pressure would only increase, he predicted.“I think we’re seeing in quite a few countries part of the population starting to be more accepting of tax rises potentially coming out of this crisis, but I don’t think they will be more accepting of companies not behaving well on the other side of this.“I think we’re seeing in quite a few countries part of the population starting to be more accepting of tax rises potentially coming out of this crisis”Morten Nilsson, CEO of the BT Pension Scheme“My view is that will be increasingly both on the corporate side of behaving well, but also that asset owners are behaving well and perhaps the more aggressive types of capitalism won’t have a place here,” Nilsson said.Looking further ahead, Nilssen said he believed in the notion of a green post-COVID-19 recovery as a huge opportunity.“I think that if we implement that successfully, that will change the world in numerous ways and actually through growth and investment returns, it will be the right thing,” he said.Interesting opportunities in infrastructure could arise over the next few years out of the current crisis, he said, having mentioned that the BT scheme was still in the process of a long move to shift its low-yielding traditional assets to more “cashflow-aware” assets.Right now, the BT pension fund was also interested in technology investments, he said, with that sector having been performing well though the crisis.On the subject of reallocation decisions pension funds had made so far in the coronavirus crisis, Pilcher said USS had taken the opportunity to shift much of its US fixed income assets to UK equivalents.“We held quite a lot of US conventional long-dated fixed income instruments and as those frankly went to the moon and outperformed all assets – particularly as there was a flight to safety, a flight to liquidity – we used that as an opportunity to reposition a lot of those back into the UK where those equivalent assets had not performed as strongly,” he said, adding that this meant the UK debt had more scope for upward moves.USS had also had relatively little investment grade credit before the crisis, he said.“We’ve seen that as an opportunity to buy repriced and cheaper assets that we think have a structurally strong place in our pension plan so we’ve used that as an opportunity as well,” Pilcher told the panel.Looking for IPE’s latest magazine? Read the digital edition here. The chief executive officers of two major UK pension schemes told an online audience yesterday that companies behaving in a socially-irresponsible way during the coronavirus crisis will not be supported by government, consumers – or pension funds.Speaking in an online investment panel discussion, Simon Pilcher, CEO of USS Investment Management, said: “Those businesses that are going to look to exploit the current situation, and say just because I can, I will cut my workers’ wages by 20% and thus grow my bottom line […] I think they will be met with savage opprobrium.”They would be scorned in the press and probably by their consumers who would vote with their feet, the head of the UK universities pension scheme investment arm said, adding that such companies would also be “brutally treated” by governments.“Thus I would say that is a poor business decision for them to be engaged in that and that is not the sort of business we’d be backing. That’s not the sort of activity we would be encouraging,” Pilcher told the audience at the asset owners event held by Bloomberg.last_img read more

National stadiums set for privatization: Kpege

first_imgDirector-General of the National Sports Authority Joe Kpenge says the decision to go into Public Private Partnership on the facilities of the National Sports Authority is to give them a face-lift and not to sell them off. There were indications government was on the verge of handing over the maintenance of the national stadia to private entrepreneurs following the NSA inability to keep the stadium in shape over the years.Joe Kpenge however insists the NSA will resist any such move and fingers the government for the poor state of the facilities at the stadiums“To be able to take care of our facilities and develop sports this year, we will give you this money and the money is not given to us or you give us only 25 percent and yet the society is expecting us to deliver on the objectives and the mandates they have handed us,” said Mr. Kpenge“We have always kept you inform that this is what is happening to us but i don’t see you going to those places to find out whether you what we are saying is true or not and asking them the hard questions, why is there the law that you should give this people this amount of money this year and you have not given to them? What is going on,? he questioned.“Go to the Ministry of Sports and Finance and tell them this is what the NSA is saying. “We are not handing over government asset to a private person to do whatever he likes with it so be rest assured.”last_img read more