Category: ccgieldf

KKR not worried, Ganguly knows his duties well: Mysore

first_imgKolkata: Three cricket fans in Kolkata might have questions about Cricket Association of Bengal (CAB) president Sourav Ganguly’s position as Delhi Capitals advisor when they take on Kolkata Knight Riders at Eden Gardens on Friday, but KKR CEO Venky Mysore has batted for the former India skipper and said that Ganguly is a thorough professional and no question marks can be raised on him. Mysore said that Ganguly knows his duties and role well and there was no reason for KKR to be worried. “He is a thorough professional. He knows how to do his duties well. He’s fully supportive of what we are doing. We have no issues at all,” the KKR CEO said. Earlier, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) Ombudsman and Ethics Officer D K Jain had received complaints from cricket fans in West Bengal that the CAB president will be ‘conflicted’ if he continues in his role as advisor to DC when they play KKR at Eden Gardens. With Jain asking Ganguly for his reply to the questions raised, the former India skipper sent in a mail which read: “At present I do not hold any post whatsoever or howsoever in the BCCI. I am neither a member of the Apex Council of the BCCI nor an office bearer nor a member of any of the Cricket Committees constituted by the BCCI under its Constitution. “I am also not connected with the administration, management or running of the IPL by being a member of any of the committees or other organisational units set up by the BCCI in connection with the IPL. Previously I had been a part of the BCCI Technical Committee; the IPL Technical Committee and the IPL Governing Council. I have resigned and/or withdrawn myself from all the said Committees,” he said.last_img read more

Morocco and China to Create Direct Flight, Open Use of Airspace

By Oumaïma Fassi FihriRabat – An upcoming China-Morocco aviation agreement is set to open a direct flight between the countries and eliminate restrictions on use of airspace.The Moroccan minister of transport and tourism, Mohamed Sajid, met the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) administrator, Feng Zhenglin, last Thursday, September 27, to discuss a new agreement on air transport. The agreement will allow Moroccan and Chinese airlines to use the airspace of the other’s country without restrictions.  Representatives from Royal Air Maroc and unnamed Chinese companies were also present during the meeting. The airline companies talked about creating the first direct flight linking the two countries.According to the Maghreb Arab Press (MAP), Mr. Sajid reported that the agreement will be officially signed by both parties by the end of this year.With China’s growing interest in Africa, the agreement is set to foster China’s activity and involvement on the continent, using Morocco as a potential bridge. The meeting comes at a time when Morocco and China have touted strengthening ties in various economic spheres such as agriculture, media, tourism, and technology. In early September, Saad Eddine El Othmani, head of government, participated in the China-Africa summit in Beijing to reinforce ties with China and seek new investments. Morocco has also explicitly supported the Chinese “Belt and Road Initiative” to create a trade network linking China with Africa and Europe. In the last few years, Morocco has successfully boosted Chinese tourism by eliminating visa restrictions in an effort to foster Sino-Moroccan cooperation. Morocco expects to have welcomed over 200,000 Chinese tourists this year by December 31. Over 100,000 Chinese tourists had arrived in Morocco in the months up to May, according to the Moroccan National Office of Tourism (ONMT). read more

Display examines the real face of Isaac Brock

Sir Isaac Brock?Ever wonder what Sir Isaac Brock really looked like? A new display outside the Learning Commons examines that exact question.The display at the south entrance in the Thistle hallway examines Brock from a physical standpoint. There are only two surviving pieces of artwork of Brock created in his lifetime, and there’s no evidence that he posed for either.One display case examines the multiple looks of Brock since his death on Oct. 13, 1812, including the flattering image of “The Hero of Upper Canada.”The second exhibit shows a more realistic examination of Brock, which Canadian artist Christian Corbet created using forensic data. Corbet is currently working on a sculpture bust of Brock for the Isle of Guernsey.The display is available until Oct. 14. After that, it will be on exhibit in Special Collections and Archives. read more

UN officials stress importance of technological innovation for African development

During a meeting with more than 20 African ministers in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, the Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), Francis Gurry, said policymakers had “a unique opportunity to define the key role that science, technology and innovation can play in achieving the development goals of the African continent.” The UN Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Wu Hongbo, underlined the link between technology and economic growth, and noted that technological progress can be used to achieve the anti-poverty targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by their 2015 deadline.Green technologies can help facilitate access to energy, while innovations in the health sector can enhance service delivery. In addition, innovation in agricultural productivity can ensure food security to growing populations.“With a fast approaching MDG deadline and transition to a post-2015 development era, innovation is a very timely topic,” Mr. Wu said. “Innovation is needed to meet our common development goals, it is important in the final push for the MDGs and in unleashing the potential for sustainable development.”The President of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), Néstor Osorio, said the African continent in particular holds a great and unexploited potential that with innovation could foster job creation and the development of cultural industries, leading to increased economic growth. “Innovation is the essence of our modern society. Without harnessing its power, we will not be able to create healthy, educated or inclusive societies,” he said. “Greater efforts are needed to build partnerships among government, private sector, civil society, academia, philanthropic organizations and the international community, to promote and spread innovation for sustainable development in Africa,” he added. The meeting was held in preparation for ECOSOC’s Annual Ministerial Review, which will take place in Geneva at the beginning of July. read more

McSwiggan scores 17 Portland cruises past USC Upstate 7356

PORTLAND, Ore. — Josh McSwiggan opened the game with a 3-point basket from the right wing, made three more in 21 minutes and scored 17 points as Portland cruised past USC Upstate 73-56 Wednesday night in the opening game of the Portland Classic.McSwiggan scored 14 of his points in the first half as 12 Pilots (4-2) saw game time. Marcus Shaver, Jr. added 13 points, JoJo Walker 11 and Theo Akwuba grabbed 11 rebounds.Deion Holmes, after missing the first three games, led USC Upstate (1-3) with 20 points on 8-for-17 shooting with three 3-pointers. The rest of the Spartans were 10 of 48The Spartans were shooting in the low 20 percents for much of the game, finishing 18 of 65 (28 per cent).Portland doubled the score on USC Upstate at the half, leading 38-19 and added an 8-0 run over two minutes early in the second half.USC Upstate put together an 11-0 run late in the game, cutting the deficit from 30 points to 69-50 on a Josh Aldrich trey.The Associated Press read more

Four Ohio State football players to play in Senior Bowl

Four seniors from the 2011-12 Ohio State football team will participate in the 2012 Senior Bowl. Offensive linemen Mike Adams and Mike Brewster, running back Daniel “Boom” Herron and wide receiver DeVier Posey will play in the event scheduled for Jan. 28 in Mobile, Ala. “This will mark the 11th straight year that Ohio State University has been represented in our game,” said Senior Bowl president and CEO, Steve Hale. “All four of these players are deserving of this opportunity to showcase their talents in front of the top decision makers in the National Football League.” Washington Redskins coach Mike Shanahan and his assistants will coach the South team and Minnesota Vikings coach Leslie Frazier and his staff will coach the North squad. The four OSU seniors helped contribute to a 39-13 record over the past four years including wins in the Rose Bowl in 2010 and the Sugar Bowl in 2011. The seniors also were a part of arguably the most tumultuous time period in OSU football history, which included the departure of former head coach Jim Tressel and the announcement of new head coach Urban Meyer. The entire 2010-11 season in which the Buckeyes went 12-1 and won the Sugar Bowl was vacated after it was discovered some players, including Herron, Adams and Posey, received improper benefits in exchange for tattoos. Herron was suspended a total of five games in 2011 for his part in the scandal and suspended an additional game for getting paid for work he didn’t perform. In the season’s final seven games, Herron rushed for 675 yards and three touchdowns. He leaves OSU as the school’s 10th leading rusher all-time with 2,869 yards. He also ranks eighth all-time with 33 career touchdowns. Adams was also suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for his part in the tattoo scandal. He started 25 games in his OSU career and was selected as a 2010 first-team all-Big Ten pick by the coaches and the media. From the fourth game of his freshman year, Brewster started 49 consecutive games at center. He was picked as a 2010 first-team All-American by the Football Writers Association of America. Posey was suspended a total of ten games in the 2011 season for receiving improper benefits for tattoos and being compensated for work he didn’t perform. He finished his career with 136 receptions for 1,955 yards, which rank sixth and eighth respectively all-time at OSU. The four players will travel to Mobile, Ala., for a week of practices before the game. Kickoff is set for 3 p.m. at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. read more

Wood to complete Rhyolite Ridge lithiumboron PFS in Nevada USA

first_imgWood has been selected by Australian-based lithium-boron mine developer Global Geoscience Ltd to complete the PFS for the Rhyolite Ridge lithium-boron project in Nevada, USA. 100% owned by Global Geoscience, Rhyolite Ridge is a large, shallow lithium-boron deposit located close to existing infrastructure in southern Nevada.Wood’s scope of work on the project includes the preparation of a comprehensive PFS. The first phase will involve a series of value engineering trade-off studies of different options and demonstrate the robust economics of the project. The second phase comprises the completion of a JORC Code-compliant PFS.Bob MacDonald, CEO of Wood’s Specialist Technical Solutions, comments: “Rhyolite Ridge is one of the largest lithium and boron deposits in North America. We look forward to applying our strong technical capability and experience in lithium processing on this project to support Global Geoscience in realizing this exciting lithium-boron growth opportunity.”Global Geoscience’s Managing Director, Bernard Rowe said: “Wood’s capabilities and strong technical team are an exceptionally good fit for the Rhyolite Ridge PFS. Wood has completed numerous studies for mining projects in Nevada as well as relevant studies for various lithium and boron projects globally.Strategic location: stable, mining friendly jurisdiction and close to existing infrastructureLarge and scaleable: near-surface 460 Mt Resource contains 4.1 Mt of lithium carbonate and 11.3 Mt of boric acid.The latest results from ongoing optimisation acid-leach test work on Rhyolite Ridge lithium-boron mineralisation show that reducing the crush size improves both leach time and recoveries:Column leach time reduced from 41 to 15 days – a 60% reductionRecoveries to solution increased to 97% for lithium and 98% for boronVat leach test work returned high recoveries of both lithium (92%) and boron (80%)Further improvements for vat and column tests likely with ongoing optimisation test workWood is conducting trade-off studies as part of the PFS to determine the optimal processing route.Global’s Rhyolite Ridge is the only lithium deposit in the world that has been demonstrated to be amenable to simple acid leach processing, reinforcing it as a credible alternative to spodumene and brine deposits as a major, low-cost and long-term source of lithium.last_img read more

EHF EURO 2012 12 Final Serbia – Croatia and Spain – Denmark

In the EHF EURO 2012 Semifinals on the next Friday will play Denmark and Spain before the Balkan’s clash between Serbia against Croatia.For the fifth place will play another Ex-Yu Teams, Slovenia against Macedonia.Match scheduleFriday 27 January 201215:15 hrs: Placement Match 5/6: Macedonia vs. Slovenia17:45 hrs: Semi-Final 1: Denmark vs. Spain20:15 hrs: Semi-Final 2: Serbia vs. CroatiaSaturday 28 January 2012Rest daySunday 29 January 201214:30 hrs: Placement Match 3/417:00 hrs: FinalEHF EURO 2012 Ranking7. Germany8. Hungary9. Poland10. Iceland11. France12. Sweden13. Norway14. Czech Rep.15. Russia16. Slovakia ← Previous Story IHF World Handball Player 2011 Nominations – Vote! Next Story → Serbs are ready for “historical battle” (20.15): “The most important game in our lives” read more

Navigon brings full GPS solution to Windows Phone for 2999

first_imgWindows Phone users who have received the update to 7.5 (aka Mango) already have access to Bing Maps-powered turn-by-turn GPS navigation, but it doesn’t provide all the bells and whistles some competitors’ solutions do. Fortunately, there’s a new Windows Phone app from Navigon that fills the gap.Right now, Navigon is priced at $29.99 for the U.S. version and $69.99 for the European edition. Yes, in a world of 99-cent apps these might seem steep, but it’s a small price to pay to turn your Windows Phone into a tricked-out GPS.In addition to offering turn-by-turn directions, Navigon offers speed and lane assistance, Google local search, pedestrian navigation, automatic switching between day and night modes, and Navigon Safety Camera — which alerts you to the presence of those pesky automated traffic violation cameras. It’s also got the slick Navigon Reality scanner, which uses augmented reality to find points of interest near your current location.Navigon also integrates with your address book to provide simple directions from your location to their home or work addresses. There’s also a one-touch Take Me Home function that gets you back to your place with minimal fuss.To see the Navigon app in action, check out the preview video from WM PowerUser below.Navigon also recently released Traffic4All for Windows Phone, which lets you keep tabs on local traffic conditions as you drive for just $1.49. If a $30 navigation app isn’t something you’re interested in, Traffic4All is certainly well worth checking out. It doesn’t take too many re-routes around congestion to make up a buck and a half in fuel savings.More at Wp7 Applistlast_img read more

Former BitTorrent exec says Pirate Pay is probably ineffective and illegal

first_imgYou probably heard the news about a little Russian company that claims to have the silver bullet that will end BitTorrent piracy once and for all. The confusingly named Pirate Pay (I love a pun) claims that its technology can stop any torrent dead. Now the former VP of engineering at BitTorrent Inc, John Pettitt, has pointed out that Pirate Pay might be more smoke and mirrors than Hollywood’s salvation.Pirate Pay claims to have blocked nearly 45,000 illegal downloads of a film late last year in its first studio contract. The details are not clear, but it appears the technology supplies fake data to the torrent swarm, which causes clients to disconnect. Pettitt says the claims sound dubious. In fact, Pettitt believes that BitTorrent clients using the UDP protocol might not be affected at all. Since this is common in modern clients, Pirate Pay might only be blocking users of old software and those with UDP tracking disabled.Pettitt also has a concern with the legality of the company’s practices. He likens flooding users with spoofed traffic from multiple servers to a distributed denial of service attack (DDoS). DDoS attacks are usually the realm of blackhat hackers and activist collectives like Anonymous; not legitimate businesses.Should the Pirate Pay technology actually work, there is serious risk that the wrong swarms will be targeted. If the company gets a little overzealous trying to protect a client’s content, and legitimate torrent traffic is blocked, there could be legal consequences. Even the rights holder that contracted for the anti-p2p service could end up in hot water.The original story indicated that Microsoft had invested in the company, and that both Sony and Disney were customers. Perhaps lawyers are scurrying around now trying to figure out if Pirate Pay will end up being more trouble than it’s worth.via TechDirtlast_img read more

CBP Officials To Close Several Lanes At San Ysidro Otay Mesa Ports

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 11:23 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN YSIDRO (KUSI) – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials will shut down several lanes of traffic beginning Tuesday morning at the San Ysidro and Otay Mesa ports of entry to install equipment in preparation for the arrival of the migrant caravan, the agency said.Beginning at 8 a.m. Tuesday, the agency will shut down three northbound lanes at the San Ysidro Port of Entry and one lane at the Otay Mesa Port of Entry.The lanes will be closed to install equipment “in preparation for the migrant caravan and the potential safety and security risk that it could cause,” the agency said in a statement.On Thursday, 1,100 Marines from Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton were deployed to the U.S.-Mexico border to support border security, mainly by installing concertina wire and pre-positioning jersey barriers, barricades and fencing under Operation Secure Line.“CBP has been and will continue to prepare for the potential arrival of thousands of people migrating in a caravan heading towards the border of the United States,” Pete Flores, director of San Diego field operations for Customs and Border Protection said in a statement.Customs and Border Protection officials recommended that motorists crossing from Tijuana into San Diego should expected increased wait times because of the lane closures.The closures are expected to last “until sometime after people in the caravan arrive to the border,” the agency said.On Thursday, a group of 5,000 migrants, mostly from Honduras, voted to proceed from Mexico City to Tijuana. It was unclear when they might reach the U.S. border.The KUSI Chopper was flying over the border area, the line of cars waiting to enter the country was extremely long. Check it out in the video here. KUSI Newsroom center_img Posted: November 13, 2018 November 13, 2018 CBP Officials To Close Several Lanes At San Ysidro, Otay Mesa Ports Of Entrylast_img read more

Lack of Macau branding strategy preventing true tourism diversification Glenn McCartney

first_img 70% of Macau gaming market driven by 400,000 premium players: brokerage RelatedPosts New Chief Executive vows to protect Macau’s gaming and tourism industry from harm Load More “We have in fact become more reliant on gaming revenues and more reliant on a single market, being China, and within that single market Guangzhou comprises 45% of our visitation, so we haven’t even diversified within China,” said McCartney, Associate Professor of International Integrated Resort Management at the University of Macau.“Nearly 7.5 million Chinese went to Japan (in 2018) without gaming being the reason, so there are a lot of Chinese travelling overseas, but not to Macau. Why? One reason is our branding strategy.”McCartney said that one key problem facing Macau tourism was the different goals of the government, which is pushing a more mass-market focused tourist mix, compared with operators and their VIP and Premium Mass target.“The IRs have to deliver on their bottom line, so they’re going to go after the customer that can spend the most which means they’ll stick with VIP and Premium Mass. In fact, they will look to grow that market so they will give comped rooms,” he said.McCartney suggested the only way for Macau to truly become diversified was for the Macao Government Tourism Office (MGTO) to sit down with operators and devise a collaborative pathway forward.“The MGTO is responsible for enforcement of licenses for restaurants and hotels, but it needs to work with the industry not just as an enforcer but also as a partner, recognising that the IRs are key to revenue,” he added. “That has got to be the framework.” Macau is as far away from achieving true diversification of its tourism industry as ever, with a lack of collaboration between the government and IR operators preventing the SAR from establishing a coherent brand strategy.The tough assessment was delivered by Professor Glenn McCartney on Wednesday during a keynote address at a France Macau Chamber of Commerce Breakfast Meeting at Ponte 16. JW Marriott at Galaxy Macau named venue and Galaxy Entertainment Group named Venue Sponsor for 2019 Asian Gaming Power 50 Black Tie Gala Dinnerlast_img read more

Time Inc Names Randall Rothenberg Chief Digital Officer

first_imgJack Griffin, CEO of Time Inc., today announced that he’s appointed Randall Rothenberg into the newly created position of EVP, chief digital officer. Rothenberg, who will officially start in January and report to Griffin, joins Time Inc. from the Interactive Advertising Bureau where he served as its president and CEO. Rothenberg [pictured] is being handed a wide range of duties, not the least of which is overseeing the company’s digital strategy. Within that, he’s charged with business development, including uncovering new revenue opportunities and potential digital acquisition targets. He’ll also sit on the board of Next Issue Media, joining colleagues Griffin and EVP and general counsel Maurice Edelson. Still on that board, by the way, is Monica Ray, who joined Condé Nast as executive vice president of consumer marketing last summer. Prior to that Ray was Time Inc.’s senior vice president of corporate digital development. Her prior leadership role in Time Inc.’s digital initiatives is a vacancy that Rothenberg is now plugging up.”Randall has participated in every aspect of the digital media marketplace-from content creation to marketing revenue-giving him a unique perspective that will be critical to his new position,” said Griffin in a statement. Along with his strategic responsibilities, Rothenberg will also be overseeing the creation of an internal digital incubator called the Center for Digital Innovation. Time Inc. employees and “others” will be given seed funding to develop new digital projects. In the meantime, IAB is announcing that, as a search for a new CEO commences, executive vice president and chief operating officer Patrick Dolan will provide interim leadership for the association.last_img read more

Alaska News Nightly Friday Apr 15 2016

first_imgStories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprnDownload AudioFormer Fairbanks Borough Mayor to serve on pipeline boardAndrew Kitchenman, KTOO – JuneauThe Legislature Friday narrowly approved former Fairbanks North Star Borough Mayor Luke Hopkins to serve on the board responsible for developing the Alaska gas pipeline.Renewable Energy Fund, casualty of budget crunch, may get new lifeRachel Waldholz, APRN – AnchorageOne casualty of the state’s budget crisis this year is investment in renewable energy. Since 2008, Alaska’s Renewable Energy Fund has supported scores of projects around the state, most of them aimed at replacing expensive diesel fuel with everything from wind to hydro to biomass. So far, the state budget includes no money for the fund. But a bill passed by the Senate this week would try to replace some of that funding in years to come.Walker says he’d veto Anchorage legislative office purchaseAssociated PressGov. Bill Walker says he would veto the purchase of a legislative office building in Anchorage if that item remains in the state infrastructure budget.Final vote count: Girdwood to pay for police, Marsett beats SchusterZachariah Hughes, KSKA – AnchorageA week and a half after ballots were cast, outstanding votes in Anchorage’s municipal election have all been counted.University of Alaska faces $50 million cut due to committee voteAndrew Kitchenman, KTOO – JuneauThe University of Alaska faces a $50 million budget cut, due to a legislative committee vote on Thursday.Low clouds a possible factor in Wrangell-Angoon plane crashEd Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska JuneauWeather may have been a factor in April 8th’s plane crash on Admiralty Island. The crash killed the pilot and two passengers and badly injured another person on board.EPA retiree, pulled back into Pebble, says he’s doneLiz Ruskin, APRN – Washington D.C.Retired EPA scientist Phil North, the alleged mastermind behind the effort to block the Pebble mine, spent a full day answering questions from a congressional committee Thursday. Now, he says he’s done with the issue – or he hopes he is – and he’s heading to Bali.Proposed motor fuels, mining, and fisheries’ taxes rolled into one billAssociated PressThree tax proposals have been rolled into one bill being considered by a state House committee.Correctional farm saves money, redirects livesAnne Hillman, KSKA – AnchoragePoint Mackenzie Correctional Farm in Wasilla produces food for prisons around the state and donates thousands of pounds of produce to the Food Bank. But some say the most important thing is helping the inmates find direction.AK: Mayuri dancers bring Bollywood to AnchorageEllen Lockyer, KSKA – AnchorageWhere ya gonna go when looking for a professional dance group to demonstrate the intricacies of traditional Indian dance? Russia, of course. Or that’s what the Asian Alaskan Cultural Center did to bring Mayuri, a group of twenty or so young dancers, to Anchorage. The the troupe performed for high schools this week and for the public Friday evening  at the Alaska Performing Arts Center.49 Voices: John Giraldo of AnchorageKaysie Ellingson, Alaska Public Media – AnchorageThis week we’re hearing from John Giraldo of Anchorage. On most days John is working as a supervisor, but in his free time he’s an extreme alpinist.last_img read more

Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in

first_imgIn vivo microscopy imaging of blood vascular endothelial cells using QD-Ab conjugates. Credit: PNAS, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1421632111 (Phys.org)—To understand cell function, we need to be able to study them in their native environment, in vivo. While there are many techniques for studying cells in vitro, or in the laboratory setting, in vivo studies are much more difficult. A new study by a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard Medical School used a unique quantum dot-antibody conjugate to facilitate in vivo studies of bone marrow stem cells in mice. This study was reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Typically, to study a cell in vivo involves making invasive modifications to the cell or the organism that disrupt the cell’s native environment. Additionally, many in vivo studies involve studying groups of cells, rather than tracking a single cell. Prior techniques involved manipulating the cells by immunohistochemistry, genetic engineering, or irradiation of the organism. All of these techniques either create substantial changes to the native environment, or they are only able to look at a “snapshot” of the cell interacting with its environment. It cannot study the movement of the cell throughout the body.Quantum dots are semi-conductor-like nanoparticles with optical properties that can be finely tuned for a wide range of optical-based studies, including infrared and fluorescence. Han, et al. targeted a particular cell type by combining quantum dots with antibodies matched to the cell’s surface receptors, so that they would combine like a lock and key . Their quantum dot-antibody system was built from quantum dots combined with polyimidazole ligands (PILs) and norbornene. PILs are highly stable and will coat the surface of quantum dots. Norbornene is a versatile functional group that maintains a neutral charge, making it a good choice for diffusing throughout the body. Norbornene was attached to an antibody that was specific for Sca1+c-Kit+ cells, which are a type of stem cell found in the calvarial bone marrow. The quantum dot-antibody conjugates were small enough to diffuse through the cell and were specific enough that they did not attach to unwanted cells. Additionally, they provided an adequate signal for optical studies and flow cytometry, allowing the study of Sca1+c-Kit+ cell diffusion in the bone marrow of unmanipulated mice. This method for studying single cells in their native environment is versatile enough to be used for other cell types by attaching different antibodies to a quantum dot. Additionally, the study showed that the quantum dot-antibody conjugates were highly stable with a long circulation half-life, allowing for a more extensive study of cellular interactions in vivo. Finally, the purification process produced highly pure conjugates with few unbound molecules, and the quantum dot-antibody conjugate size was appropriate for diffusion through the mouse. This research has broader applications, as many of the factors the researchers addressed are constraints for any in vivo cell studies. © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Explore further More information: Quantum dot/antibody conjugates for in vivo cytometric imaging in mice, Hee-Sun Han, PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1421632111AbstractMultiplexed, phenotypic, intravital cytometric imaging requires novel fluorophore conjugates that have an appropriate size for long circulation and diffusion and show virtually no nonspecific binding to cells/serum while binding to cells of interest with high specificity. In addition, these conjugates must be stable and maintain a high quantum yield in the in vivo environments. Here, we show that this can be achieved using compact (∼15 nm in hydrodynamic diameter) and biocompatible quantum dot (QD) -Ab conjugates. We developed these conjugates by coupling whole mAbs to QDs coated with norbornene-displaying polyimidazole ligands using tetrazine–norbornene cycloaddition. Our QD immunoconstructs were used for in vivo single-cell labeling in bone marrow. The intravital imaging studies using a chronic calvarial bone window showed that our QD-Ab conjugates diffuse into the entire bone marrow and efficiently label single cells belonging to rare populations of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (Sca1+c-Kit+ cells). This in vivo cytometric technique may be useful in a wide range of structural and functional imaging to study the interactions between cells and between a cell and its environment in intact and diseased tissues. Citation: Quantum dots combined with antibodies as a method for studying cells in their native environment (2015, January 27) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-01-quantum-dots-combined-antibodies-method.html Shining a light on quantum dots measurementlast_img read more

Have you seen these parking spaces taped off This is why

first_imgGet the biggest Daily stories by emailSubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribingSee our privacy noticeCould not subscribe, try again laterInvalid EmailA number of parking spaces are currently cordoned off in the city centre. Several Sentinel readers contacted us to say the spaces, on Broad Street in Hanley, were coned off and bags had been put over the ticket machines. Now the council have revealed the parking spaces have been cordoned off so coaches and take children to and from the pantomimes at the city centre’s theatres. Read MoreCCTV appeal after doctor assaulted at railway station A Stoke-on-Trent City Council spokesman said: “Parking is suspended on the street so that the coaches can pick up and drop off children attending the pantomimes at the theatres over the next couple of days. “Signs installed on street and cones and the machines are bagged off.”last_img read more

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first_imgFind more news and videos from AAPM. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Technology Reports View all 9 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. 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Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha.center_img Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Videos | December 14, 2011 McKesson Highlights Image Repository Management Find more SCCT news and videos Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Information Technology View all 220 items Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Women’s Health View all 62 items At RSNA 2011, McKesson showcased the management capabilities of its enterprise image repository. The system allows users to create use policies for content. It also helps better control image study life-cycle management, so older studies can be archived to more cost-effective media or deleted from the system.For more information: www.allaboutPACS.com Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Recent Videos View all 606 items Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Imaging View all 288 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

Axillary Radiotherapy and Lymph Node Surgery Yield Comparable Outcomes for Breast Cancer

first_img News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Artificial Intelligence | August 13, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Could Yield More Accurate Breast Cancer Diagnoses University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that… read more Related Content News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Neuro Imaging | August 16, 2019 ADHD Medication May Affect Brain Development in Children A drug used to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to affect development of the brain’s… read more News | Radiation Therapy | December 18, 2018 Axillary Radiotherapy and Lymph Node Surgery Yield Comparable Outcomes for Breast Cancer Results of AMAROS clinical trial suggest axillary radiotherapy may provide treatment alternative with fewer side effects News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communicationscenter_img Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD News | PACS | August 09, 2019 Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and… read more News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more Image courtesy of Imago Systems December 17, 2018 — Early-stage breast cancer patients with cancer detected in a sentinel lymph node biopsy had comparable 10-year recurrence and survival rates following either axillary radiotherapy or axillary lymph node dissection, according to new data. The data from the randomized, phase III AMAROS clinical trial were presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 4-8.”Patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer who have no clinical evidence of local spread of disease to axillary (armpit) lymph nodes, meaning that palpation or ultrasound shows no sign of disease spread, undergo a sentinel lymph node biopsy,” said Emiel J. T. Rutgers, M.D., Ph.D., the principal investigator of the AMAROS clinical trial and a surgical oncologist at the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam. “Traditionally, those patients who had cancer detected in a sentinel lymph node biopsy underwent axillary lymph node dissection, which is an effective but invasive surgical procedure that is associated with adverse side effects such as lymphedema and difficulties moving the arm.”The AMAROS clinical trial was conducted to test whether axillary radiotherapy could yield comparable outcomes to axillary lymph node dissection with fewer adverse side effects. The trial was conducted by Rutgers; Mila Donker, M.D., Ph.D., a radiation oncologist at the Netherlands Cancer Institute; and colleagues from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and ALMANAC breast cancer research organizations.”Our new 10-year data show that axillary radiotherapy and axillary lymph node dissection provide excellent and comparable overall survival, distant-metastasis-free survival and locoregional control,” said Donker. “Given that we previously published five-year follow-up data from the trial showing that lymphedema occurred significantly more often after axillary lymph node dissection than after axillary radiotherapy, we believe that axillary radiotherapy should be considered a good option for patients who have a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy instead of complete surgical clearance of the axillary lymph nodes.”Updated five-year follow-up information on quality of life and morbidity show again that radiotherapy is associated with significantly less lymphedema as compared to surgery.Of the 4,806 patients with early-stage, clinically node-negative breast cancer who the researchers enrolled in the trial, 1,425 went on to have a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy; 744 of these patients had been randomly assigned to the axillary lymph node dissection group and 681 to the axillary radiotherapy group.After 10 years, 1.82 percent (11 out 681 patients) of those assigned to axillary radiotherapy had axillary recurrence, compared with 0.93 percent (7 out of 744 patients) of those assigned to axillary lymph node dissection. In addition, neither distant metastasis-free survival nor overall survival were significantly different between the two treatment arms. Distant metastasis-free survival was 78.2 percent among those assigned to axillary radiotherapy and 81.7 percent among those assigned to axillary lymph node dissection; overall survival in the two arms was 81.4 percent and 84.6 percent, respectively.A significantly greater proportion of patients assigned to axillary radiotherapy went on to develop a second primary cancer than did patients assigned to axillarylymph node dissection, 11 percent versus 7.7 percent. Donker explained this difference was mainly due to a higher incidence of contralateral breast cancer in the patients treated with axillary radiotherapy. She also noted that since the radiation technique of that time was performed with the use of two tangential fields, the “extra” radiation to the contralateral breast by including an axillary, or periclavicular field is negligible.”We have found no indication that the increased incidence of second primary cancers is induced by the radiotherapy,” said Donker. “Therefore, we strongly believe that axillary radiotherapy is a good alternative to axillary lymph node dissection in this group of patients.””Data from another recent clinical trial suggested that there may be some patients who do not need axillary treatment even if they have a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy,” added Rutgers. “Moving forward, we need to better tailor treatment for each individual patient. Some will still need axillary treatment, and our data indicate that axillary radiotherapy is a good option here.”According to the researchers, the main limitation of the study is that the size of the radiation field was greater than what is currently deemed necessary, which caused some morbidity that may now be avoided. There was also an imbalance in the number of patients who had a sentinel lymph node biopsy in the two arms and the number of recurrences was by far lower than expected, reducing the statistical power of the study. However, the researchers noted that these limitations do not adversely affect the conclusion from the trial data that axillary radiotherapy is not inferior to axillary lymph node dissections in terms of locoregional control.For more information: www.sabcs.org FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Images of regions of interest (colored lines) in the white matter skeleton representation. Data from left and right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR) were averaged. Image courtesy of C. Bouziane et al. The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. News | Mammography | August 14, 2019 Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year… read more last_img read more

Nicaragua hopes to lure a better tourist

first_imgNo related posts. By David Hutt | Special to The Tico TimesMANAGUA, Nicaragua – Not far from the city of Rivas, in southern Nicaragua, a $40 million luxury resort is expected to open in coming months. Mukul will boast 37 rooms, a 24-hour butler service, world-class spas, and a golf course designed by the internationally renowned designer David McLay. ProNicaragua, an investment promotion agency, describes it as the country’s “first full-fledged luxury hotel.” The resort is situated within a far bigger project, Guacalito de la Isla, a 1,670-acre site on which 600 exquisite residences will be built for retirees or wealthy jet-setters, as well as a proposed private airstrip. Behind these projects is Carlos Pellas, one of Nicaragua’s leading capitalists and a regular on lists of the wealthiest Latin Americans.To stay for one night at the Mukul resort will set visitors back $500.  But executives are not biting their nails with fear of empty rooms. Last year, they hired the luxury travel promoter Kurtz-Ahlers & Associates to publicize the resort, and for the past few months the finest international travel agencies have been touring Nicaragua and the resort.Tourists with deeper pocketsA recent statement by ProNicaragua asked, “What transforms a country from tourism pariah to hot destination for wealthy travelers? First, you need a place for opulence-seeking people to stay.” It is perhaps wrong to call Nicaragua a pariah. In 2010, the country welcomed for the first time more than one million visitors. Last year, this number was up to 1.2 million. Nicaragua also is not short on accolades. It was named the “No. 1 Emerging Destination” by Wanderlust Travel and ranked third on the New York Times list of travel destination for 2013. But Nicaragua is a pariah if you view tourism by how much money is spent. In Costa Rica, the average visitor spends $118 a day. In Nicaragua, a visitor spends just $43. The goal of the Nicaraguan government is to welcome a “better” class of tourist – those with larger wallets and less frugal minds. Recently, Tourism Minister Mario Salinas said, “We have to bring two million tourists here a year, but we need them to spend $100-$130 per day.”According to the minister, those figures would help Nicaragua “preserve our nature, our culture, our folklore, and our traditions, because that’s what we have to sell. And if we lose that, we have killed the golden goose.”For Salinas, Nicaragua needs to increase its revenue from tourists through quality, not quantity. Tourism officials would prefer two million travelers spending $100 each per day, rather than five million spending half that amount. In addition to the Mukul resort, Nicaragua can claim dozens of other luxury resorts aimed at the high-end market. Even on the remote Little Corn Island in the Caribbean Sea, the soon-to-be-completed Yemaya Island Retreat will charge almost 10 times as much as most current accommodations. The change has been no accident. Since returning to power in 2007, President Daniel Ortega has led his country headfirst into the tourism industry. In 2010, the industry was still nascent, but since then, Nicaragua has seen nothing but progress.  Speaking at last month’s Central American Advantage Conference in Managua, Julio Videa, the Tourism Ministry’s director of marketing and promotion, stated that over the past five years the Nicaraguan government has invested more than $400 million in infrastructure for tourism. In the past three years it has increased the budget for tourism five-fold. “We expect a new airport near Managua to be completed soon, as well as a marina in San Juan del Sur,” Videa said.  There also is talk of an airport near the colonial capital of León. However, while progress occurs and Nicaragua welcomes more tourists with deeper pockets, it is essential that those in charge do not lose sight of the bigger picture, observers note. Tourism is a means to an end – economic development and social improvement must also be a priority in Central America’s poorest country. Nicaragua also cannot forget its backpackers and “volun-tourists,” who may not spend hundreds of dollars a day, but provide a far greater social value to the country.In any case, the march continues towards luxury resorts and high-end tourism. It will take many years to approach the standards set by Costa Rica, but Nicaragua has high aspirations and a government with a track record of meeting tourism goals. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Canadian PM in India to boost economic ties

first_img Sponsored Stories Harper will meet Prime Minister Manmohan Singh later Tuesday, when the two sides are expected to sign several economic agreements, the statement said.The Press Trust of India news agency said the two would also discuss civil nuclear cooperation.Harper will also meet India’s president, the governing Congress party leader and the leader of the opposition.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) How men can have a healthy 2019 Top Stories Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenix Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Daycenter_img 3 international destinations to visit in 2019 Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Top ways to honor our heroes on Veterans Day Comments   Share   NEW DELHI (AP) – Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper is meeting with Indian leaders to expand cooperation in civil nuclear energy, mining, higher education, and science and technology.Canada is seeking to boost its presence in Asia, and two-way trade touched $5.2 billion last year, up more than 28 percent from 2010. Total Canadian investment in India was estimated about $4.3 billion, India’s External Affairs Ministry said in a statement.last_img read more